Overview

Suicide Girls #2

Review

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Suicide Girls #2

Credits

  • Words: Steve Niles, Missy Suicide, Brea Grant, Zane Grant
  • Art: David Hahn, Cameron Stewart
  • Colors: Antonio Fabela
  • Publisher: IDW Publishing
  • Price: $3.99
  • Release Date: May 25, 2011

The Suicide Girls are back in their new comic book venture, with the girls out to defeat Way*Of*Life, the moralistic masterminds who run the world they now live in. Fighting conformity with freedom is their goal, and they'll do it in as little clothing as possible.
Is the beauty of the Suicide Girls only skin and ink deep, or is there more to this book? 

Suicide Girls has been an interesting experiment. How exactly do you take a web site known for its pinups and photoshoots of "alternative" models and turn that into a narrative? They've done a movie and even an iOS dating sim, but a comic book lets them craft completely new characters, combining elements of their models and what their fanbase wants and coming up with some interesting visuals. Tattoos and piercings are prevalent, alongside blue and purple hair colors. In fact, the most "comic book" styling in the series is the corset piercing turned sword sheath.  With this being just the second issue, it’s good to see that the story has jumped into full gear.

While the Girls distrusted Frank (the above-mentioned sword-wielder) in the first issue, she's now fully part of the mission and already one of the team. Porter, the glasses-and-tech character, gets the bulk of the issue's focus; every character but her tends to slip into the background. Script-wise, the dialogue leans a little too much towards referential and expository, with the Way*Of*Life foundation's goals and mindset clearly laid out. Much like the work of Bendis or, ironically, Whedon, characters namedrop programs such as Dollhouse, Mystery Science Theater 3000, and Total Recall to an almost-aggravating, "look at us; we're realistic!" dialogue that's diametrically opposed to unrealistic action, such as slicing a Terminator knock-off in half while fighting in your underwear. The characters’ admittance that fighting in underwear is inconvenient and awkward is a nice touch, at least, and casual dialogue isn't always unwelcome.  

Inarguably, Cameron Stewart's art surrounding the main story is well-suited for the concept of the Suicide Girls. A great cover followed by an acceptable back-up story and a few pages of pin-up is just what the book expects. David Hahn's work in the main story is fine as well, but lacks a little bit of the poster-esque nature of Stewart's.  

Suicide Girls has been a fun, if not somewhat silly, guilty pleasure. For those wanting to see girls fighting the conformity of society, this book is definitely worth checking out. If you love the Girls and all they stand for online, it's an easy addition to your pull list.

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